Downfalls of Micromanaging Your Church Staff

by:  |  February 8th, 2016  |  Senior Leadership  | 

Truth be told, nobody likes a micromanager—except perhaps the one who is doing the managing. For those being managed, a micromanager can come across as being controlling and overbearing. These qualities are not the ones God had in mind when He called these leaders into positions of power. Here are five downfalls of micromanaging your church staff:

1) Micromanagement defies the meaning of true leadership.

Managers and leaders should seek to empower and equip church staff so that they can succeed in what they do. Micromanagement results in the exact opposite. By taking on all of the responsibility, we limit the opportunity for others to shine and grow in their roles.

2) Micromanagement is damaging to self and others.

Most micromanagers typically don’t realize how hard they’re making other people’s jobs and how damaging their management can be to themselves. Taking on all the responsibility only results in stress, and should lead to a questioning of whether or not leadership in that role is a right fit.

3) Micromanagement stifles the giftings of others.

God has gifted every person on your team with skills that have landed them in the position they’re in. Not taking advantage of these gifts or not allowing your staff to grow and develop in their giftings hurts everyone involved. For this very reason, micromanagers often stand in the way of other staff reaching their full potential.

4) Micromanagement is a clear sign of distrust.

Most micromanagers micromanage because they don’t trust others will do their jobs well. This can be detrimental to those who are trying their hardest but afraid to make a mistake because they sense this distrust. Good leaders offer grace and encourage others to take on responsibilities that may challenge them—even if they fail initially.

5) Micromanagement places the outcome on YOU rather than into God’s hands.

Ultimately, micromanagement comes as a result of not trusting God with the outcome. In order to be good leaders, we must remember who we truly serve and that God is the one who placed us in the position we’re currently in. Let’s remind ourselves of that and lead well in light of the fact that God is in control, not us.